GEN202 Islam in America

Course Description:

This course is a study of Muslims in the United States. It examines the multiple racial, cultural, and socio-economic groups that comprise this diverse community as well as major institutes of American Muslims. It interrogates Islam in America starting with the surviving African Muslim slaves and their enduring efforts to remain Muslims, and the influx of immigrants in the 1960s from different regions. This course examines the development of Islamic identity in America, the current situation, and where American Muslims are headed.

Course Code: GEN202

Credit hours: 3

Pre-Requisites: None

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will be able to write a comprehensive essay on the history and evolution of Islam in America, taking special note on the growth, challenges, contributions, and direction.
  • Students will conduct a case study and present their findings and analysis on one of the following topics (Topic and outline must be approved by the professor)
    a. Challenges of American Muslims: The social structure, institutions, current conditions, and challenges facing American Muslims
    b. Responsibilities and Contributions of American Muslims: The responsibilities of American Muslims toward their survival and identity. Include success stories and contributions as Muslim Americans and how it parallels with Islamic doctrine
    c. Masajid and Islamic Centers: An overiew of the current situation of masajid across the country, challenges that communities in various masajid face, and opportunities for the future
    d. Islamic Education: An overview of the various educational outlets for Muslims including Weekend Islamic chools, Full-time Islamic schools, Islamic Educational Institutes, and Islamic Universities. The course will cover the present reality, challenges, and opportunities.
    e. Major Islamic Organizations such as ISNA, ICNA, MAS…etc: The course will give an overview of how these organizations came to existence, the role that they play, and how they impact Muslims in the future.
  • Students will successfully analyze in front of their peers, the opportunities for American Muslims to contribute by serving their society and religion.
  • Students will engage in group discussion and analysis on Muslim sects, Islamic movements, civic engagement and community service, political participation and coalitions, interfaith events, fiqh councils and scholars.

Course Outline:

  • Introduction: Immigration pattern of Muslims since the last century, current Muslim demographics, and diversity in racial, cultural, linguistic, and Fiqh backgrounds.
  • Masajid & Islamic Centers: An overiew of the current situation of masajid across the country, challenges that communities in various masajid face, and opportunities for the future.
  • Islamic Education: An overview of the various educational outlets for Muslims including Weekend Islamic chools, Full-time Islamic chools, Islamic Educational Institutes, and Islamic Universities. The course will cover the present reality, challenges, and opportunities.
  • Muslim Sects: (Ahlul-Sunnah wa Jamaa’ah, Shiaa’h, Bahaie, Ismae’ile, Brilwy,…etc).  The course will provide an understanding of the presence of the various sects, influence they have on people, and chart a pathway for dealing with these differences in a pluralistic society
  • Islamic Movements: Similar to the various Muslim sects, there are movements within the sects to revive Islam. Some of these movements include Salafism, Muslim Brotherhood, Sufism, Tabligh, Hizbul-Tahreer … etc. The course will explain these different movements and describe how to navigate the differences.
  • Major Islamic Organizations such as ISNA, ICNA, MAS…etc: The course will give an overview of how these organizations came to existence, the role that they play, and how they impact Muslims in the future.
  • Civic Engagement & Community Service: Are we supposed to stay confined to our own worship or are we supposed to participate with the society around us? This course will describe the relationship of Muslims and the community that surrounds them
  • Political Participation & Building Coalitions: Are we allowed to vote? Are Muslims allowed to get involved in politics? This course will describe the extent to which Muslims are encouraged or discouraged from getting involved with the politcal sphere of this country.
  • Adaptation Options: Should Muslims live segregated from society and live in isolation or should they assimilate? To what extent can Muslims live in isolation or assimilation?
  • September 11th Terrorist Attacks: How has this incident impacted Islamic work? What lessons can be learned and derived? How does this day impact the future of Muslims who live in America?
  • Interfaith Relations: America is called the “melting pot” of cultures, which entails people of different faiths. How can Muslims initiate and participate in dialogues with people of other faiths in various contexts including work, school, hospital, when dealing with law enforcement among others.
  • Fiqh Councils & Muslim Scholars: Are Muslims obligated to follow one council over another? How can a Muslim identify a true scholar? What role do the Fiqh Councils and Muslims scholars play in the lives of American Muslims?

Main Textbook

Articles & Essays chosen by the Instructor.

Grading and Evaluation:

  • Minimum passing grade 70%
  • Participation: 40% (10 assignments, 4% each)
  • Oral exam: 20%
  • Mid-Term exam: 10%
  • Research paper: 20%
  • Final exam: 10%

Guidelines for Research Paper:

As part of the course, you are required to submit a research paper. The topic chosen must be relevant to the course and approved by the Instructor.

The paper must meet the following requirements:

  • At least ten (10) double-spaced pages (not including the introduction and conclusion)
  • 1 inch margins
  • 12 pt size (Times New Roman)
  • Follow the standard research paper structure with a Table of Contents, Abstract or Executive Summary, Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion, List of Reference
  • The Main Body should be organized into logical chapters and paragraphs
  • When quoting Hadith, a notation indicating its authenticity must be clearly

Please Watch:

How To Write A Research Paper

 

Communication Etiquette:

  • Post all your questions related to the course to the (Online Test) forum.
  • If sending emails directly to the lecturer, please include appropriate label in the subject line (Action Required/Info/Admin) and allow up to 3 working days for reply.
  • Limit telephone communication with the Lecturer to within specified office hours only.
  • When leaving a voicemail, please clearly state your name, course code, and contact number.

Additional Information:

Log in Instructions:

To attend live – online lectures (on their scheduled time):

Virtual Class Room

Access the course on-line by logging into Online School, accessible from

Al-Huda Online School

You will need a user name and password to:

  • View the recorded lectures if you missed the live online ones.
  • Interact with your teacher and classmates.
  • Upload and submit your assignments, research papers, and exams.
  • View your grades.
  • All attempt must be made to submit assignments by the agreed due dates. Late submissions will be penalized.
  • Weekly materials and graded assignments will be posted onto the site by Monday – in sha Allah.
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